Gallery News and Events

John Margolies

We are sad to announce news that our friend, John Margolies passed away on May 26th.

Beginning in the 1970's, John Margolies' outstanding photography of vernacular architecture for 30 years documented over 100,000 miles of main streets, motels, miniature golf courses, billboards, banks, gas pumps, movie palaces and the occasional pink flamingo.

He lectured widely and had exhibitions all over the world. Shooting with a 35mm Canon, his trips across the country were sponsored by Guggenheim Grants, and his friends, Philip Johnson and Asher Edelman. The result was thousands of images and numerous publications. 

Much of what he photographed no longer exists, but what remains are whimsical and unsentimental images of America. 

"The John Margolies archive of photographs of American roadside architecture is acknowledged as the most comprehensive study of this subject extant."

Leanne Mella
Visual Arts Program Specialist
United States Department of State

 

"This is a forgotten portion of the great American architectural heritage, and John Margolies is perhaps the leading historian in this field.... It is vital for us ... to see America through his eyes."

Philip Johnson, The End of the Road

 

"Some people are obsessed with collecting Louis XIV furniture, others with beer cans or butterflies. John Margolies is obsessed with the architectural flora and fauna of American main streets, roadsides, movie theaters and resort areas--the exotic, improvisational, outrageous furnishings of the great open spaces. In the process he has helped preserve a portion of our common heritage by documenting thousands of buildings, many of them just months or even days before the bulldozers were to carry them away for good."

Phil Patton, Smithsonian Magazine

 

"Mr. Margolies, America's premier chronicler of architectural kitsch, is known for books that celebrate the weird delights of miniature golf courses, fading Catskills resorts and dilapidated roadside diners."

Herbert Muschamp, The New York Times

 

'Yes, call it kitsch if you must,' Margolies snorts, fondling a novelty demitasse cup. 'But I really don't enjoy that word. "Kitsch" was invented by intellectuals--as an excuse for not thinking about something.'"

Bob Ickes, New York Magazine

 

shasted@edelmanarts.com

+1 212 472 7770

Unity Through Abstraction: One World Trade Center’s Inaugural Art Collection

Edelman Arts and Artemus would like to share an editorial on One World Trade Center's inaugural art collection featured by Artsy.

Jose Parla,   ONE: Union of the Sense  , 2014, acrylic, ink, gesso and enamel paint on wood, 174 x 1080 in.

Jose Parla, ONE: Union of the Sense, 2014, acrylic, ink, gesso and enamel paint on wood, 174 x 1080 in.

Fritz Bultman,   Gravity of Nightfall  , 1961, oil on canvas, 3 panels, 96 x 144 in.

Fritz Bultman, Gravity of Nightfall, 1961, oil on canvas, 3 panels, 96 x 144 in.

 

Union through Abstraction: One World Trade Center's Inaugural Art Collection

by Artsy Editorial

With all the care and expense that attended the design and 13-year construction of the prismatic One World Trade Center, it’s no surprise the art that hangs in the building—which opened late last year—would be carefully considered. Curated by New York gallery Edelman Arts to complement the building’s light-filled spaces with their high ceilings and white marble, the 13 artworks on display provide a playful and colorful counterbalance to the tower’s stately architecture.

The pieces that hang in One World Trade Center, all large-scale, abstract works, were chosen for their ability to jolt World Trade tenants out of their daily grind—as the gallery’s founder, Asher Edelman, has said, the works were selected to inspire passersby “to look up from their hand-held devices and actually look around them.”

To that effect, the centerpiece for the lobby—a mural that spans a staggering 90 feet—was created by the painter José Parlá, known for his jubilant, massive works in which paint and paper are layered to create abstract works subtly reminiscent of the wheatpastes and graffiti that pepper Brooklyn, where the artist resides. With swooping, intricate lines and splashes of kaleidoscopic color, Parlá’s painting, titledONE: Union of the Senses (2014), stands as a potent reminder of the New York that breathes outside the new tower’s walls.

The “sky lobby” on the 64th floor is an airy and tranquil space—with north-facing, wall-sized windows, it feels suspended in midair. For the space, Greg Goldberg—some of whose drawings are in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art—has created a series of site-specific oil paintings over the course of several months. Goldberg paints largely using natural light, layering stripes of intersection color and tuning them over long periods of time in order to catch the sun’s rays. These paintings have been similarly rendered to act in dialogue with their surroundings.

All the works on display at One World Trade Center, including pieces by Doug ArgueFritz Bultman, and Bryan Hunt, have been selected not only to complement the muted and classically influenced architecture at the long-awaited former site of the World Trade Center, but to express the building’s universal ethos. As Andrew Dermont, one of Edelman Arts’s curators, explained, “We were trying to put art in the building that we thought would be unifying, instead of divisive. We wanted it to accommodate everyone’s tastes.”

Molly Osberg

Fritz Bultman, Blue Triptych - Intrusion into the Blue, 1961, oil on canvas, 96 x 168 in.

Greg Goldberg,   One World Trade Center Series  , 2014, oil on linen, 66 x 72 in.

Greg Goldberg, One World Trade Center Series, 2014, oil on linen, 66 x 72 in.

Greg Goldberg,   One World Trade Center Series  , 2014, oil on linen, 66 x 72 in.

Greg Goldberg, One World Trade Center Series, 2014, oil on linen, 66 x 72 in.

Greg Goldberg,   One World Trade Center Series  , 2014, oil on linen, 66 x 72 in.

Greg Goldberg, One World Trade Center Series, 2014, oil on linen, 66 x 72 in.

Doug Argue,   Isotopic,   2009-2013, oil on canvas, 114 x 162 in.

Doug Argue, Isotopic, 2009-2013, oil on canvas, 114 x 162 in.

Doug Argue,   Randomly Placed Exact Percentages  , 2009-2013, oil on canvas, 114 x 162 in.

Doug Argue, Randomly Placed Exact Percentages, 2009-2013, oil on canvas, 114 x 162 in.

UPCOMING EXHIBITION - Frank Stella: OUT-STANDING

 
FRANK STELLA   IL DIMEZZATO (#7, 3D-3X)  1987 Paint on fabricated aluminum 88" x 95" x 53"  Private Collection

FRANK STELLA
IL DIMEZZATO (#7, 3D-3X)
1987
Paint on fabricated aluminum
88" x 95" x 53"
Private Collection

Douglas Durst, Asher Edelman and David Storper are pleased to present

FRANK STELLA:
OUT-STANDING

 

An installation by ARTEMUS
Curated by FreedmanArt and Edelman Arts

On view September 19 to October 31, 2014
Opening Reception Thursday, September 18 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm
RSVP  info@edelmanarts.com 

At Anita's Way
Through Block from West 43rd Street to West 42nd Street, between Avenue of the Americas and Broadway

This installation brings an exemplary selection of Stella’s wall reliefs in a public setting, offering a new and fresh perspective on his remarkable oeuvre. Few artists’ works transition from the private to public sphere as seamlessly and successfully as those by Frank Stella.

The opening reception will also inaugurate the founding of ARTEMUS, an art leasing company providing corporations an advantageous way to enhance their work spaces with important and inspiring works of art.