Fritz Bultman

Fritz Bultman set himself apart from other Abstract Expressionists with his meticulously organized abstract compositions, use of sculpture, and the adoption of collage as a core practice.

 


Biography

Fritz Bultman set himself apart from other Abstract Expressionists with his meticulously organized abstract compositions, use of sculpture, and the adoption of collage as a core practice. Best known for his collages that incorporated pre-painted paper into semi-figurative forms and abstract compositions, Bultman drew on years of psychotherapy to explore eroticism, sexual symbolism, and myth. Robert Motherwell called him “one of the most splendid, radiant, and inspired painters of my generation,” although many believe he suffered a lack of recognition due to missing the famed 1951 Life magazine photograph that helped establish the reputation of his contemporaries.

Curriculum Vitae

    Birth Place
    Born on April 4, 1919 in New Orleans, LA

  • 1931-1932 Began his art studies at age 13 with artist Morris Graves, who was visiting New Orleans, LA
  • 1932-1935 Studied at New Orleans Arts and Crafts School, New Orleans, LA
  • 1935-1937 Studied at Munich Preparatory School, Munich, Germany where he met Hans Hofmann
  • 1937-1938 Studied at New Bauhaus School, Chicago, IL
  • 1938-1941 Studied at Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts, New York, NY
  • Studied at Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts, Provincetown, NY
  • 1940 Met Tennessee Williams in Provincetown, MA, Williams visited Bultman in Greenwich Village in the 1940s
  • 1943 Married Jeanne Lawson, a dancer, in December in New York, NY
  • 1945 Moved to Provincetown, MA
  • 1950 Signed the historical and infamous "Irascibles" letter to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, along with other New York School of Abstract Expressionist painters: William Bazioties, James Brooks, Willem de Kooning, Jimmy Ernst, Adolph Gottlieb, Robert Motherwell, Barnett Newman, Jackson Pollock, Richard Pousette-Dart, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, Hedda Sterne, Clyfford Still and Bradley Walker Tomlin.
  • 1950-1957 Received a grant to study sculpture in Italy. As a result, he was in Italy at the time of the photo shoot for the famous Abstract Expressionist photograph called "The Irascibles", and was therefore not in the photo, which was published on January 15, 1951 in Life magazine
  • 1952 Moved back to New York City
  • 1945-1955 Visited friends Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock in East Hampton, NY
  • 1958 Tennesse Williams visited the Bultman Family home in the Garden District of New Orleans, where he wrote and set the play 'Suddenly Last Summer'
  • 1958-1963 Taught at Pratt Institute, New York, NY
  • 1959-1964 Taught at Hunter College, New York, NY
  • 1962 Began to work with more collages, which would be his primary media for the next two decades
  • 1964-1965 Awarded Fulbright Fellowship, Paris, France
  • 1968 Co-Founded the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA
  • 1968-1972 Taught at Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA
  • 1975 Awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, New York, NY
  • 1985 Died on July 20, 1985 in Provincetown, MA

Past Exhibitions

Fritz Bultman: The Missing Irascible
April 4 - May 11, 2013

View Catalogue